Remix, Remake, Curate

Learning with the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, Tar River Writing Project, & The Poetry Project


Remix, Remake, Curate

Here we are in the last week of the Remake, Remix, Curate MOOC, working to make meaning by curating our making and learning moments over the past five weeks.  In this last week, we invite you to embrace the ethos of citizen science learning by remixing, remaking, and curating the #imakesci MOOC spaces.  Last Sunday, we sent out a newsletter that suggested cool digital and non-digital ways to tell your science learning stories, and this week, we hope you’ll continue using those and sharing others to help you chart and share your personal learning pathways.

What’s the difference between remixing and remaking?  Between hoarding and curating?

These are some of the questions we’ve been pondering this week as we sift through the midden heap of the MOOC and find the artifacts and relationships that define our community.  Poet CJ Suitt defines the differences between remaking and remixing as:

After a really smart question from Alyssa Harrell, a student at Hertford County Early College, Roy Campbell, Director of Exhibits at the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, responded that hoarding might very well be a precursor to curating as we don’t know what stories to tell until we see all of the objects laid out en masse.  Watch our Google Hangout recorded on Friday to hear more.

As you make this week, consider the ways you can iterate and build on others’ makes and how you might be able to make new meaning by putting unlikely words, images, videos, makes, or ideas together.   In the photo below, we took Brianna Spruill’s Six-Word #imicro poem and replaced the background image with one showing mushrooms, nature’s resident decomposers.  How does the meaning of the poem change?  What new science literacy connections can be made?

6 word poemBrianna's Remix

As a reminder, here are some places to share and connect:

  • Join our Google+ Community, Remix, Remake, Curate. Post your thoughts, questions, ideas, and especially your young people’s work here. Record student poetry, share their experiments, let them see what other kids are doing, and share feedback to their work.
  • On Twitter, we encourage you to follow and use the #imakesci hashtag. You might also include the #iremixsci hashtag to share your remixes, remakes, or curations.
  • If you have a blog, you can make and create in your own digital space and share to the community on Twitter with the #imakesci hashtag or the G+ community Remix, Remake, Curate.

For More Info

Coming up

Our final Twitter chat will be held next Friday, March 13 at 10:30am EST.  This will be the last synchronous event of the MOOC, and we’ll be reflecting on the intersections between science and literacy and the ways we’ve made participatory science.  Join us to share your makes and your ideas and to help us think through the kinds of make cycles you’d like to see in 2016!

Sincerely,

The Entire Facilitation Team at Remix, Remake, Curate


Make Cycle 4 Wrap-Up: Crystallizing Growth

Make Cycle 4: Making Growing Crystal Clear

It was fitting that our make cycle focusing on our growth and the growth of crystals was interrupted by the growth of water crystals outside. We had 3 snow days during the middle of our make cycle, but we pushed on.   We still learned a lot about growing crystals and how we could relate them to our own personal growth.  We wrote 6 word poems and participated in a Google Hangout and a Twitter chat.  As the MOOC continues, you are still invited to experiment, write, remix and share what you have done on the  G+ Community.

Thanks for growing with us!!

We know there will still be more growing to come but here is a shout out to those of you that jumped on board already…

*Michael Flinchbaugh used pipe cleaners to represent DNA, and his son Elliot used pipe cleaners to represent two things combining to make one thing like hot water and borax combine to make crystals.

*Debra Pagona’s first grade and Jennifer Anderson’s fifth grade class’ participated in making crystals, and joined us in the google chat where they wrote their 6 word poem.

*We enjoyed Menna Salam’s six word poem about growth helping us flourish. Her poem paired nicely with her pipe cleaner crystal flower.

*Jullian Nguyen created a shape of a playing card considering herself the “jack of all trades.”  We loved it!

*Braxton Williams remixed his six word poem into a six word poem using Thimble. We’re so glad he introduced us to a new tech tool for our make cycle!

 

As a reminder, here are some places to share and connect:

  • Join our Google+ Community, Remix, Remake, Curate. Post your thoughts, questions, ideas, and especially your young people’s work here. Record student poetry, share their experiments, let them see what other kids are doing, and share feedback to their work.
  • On Twitter, we encourage you to follow and use the #imakesci hashtag. Keep using #imicro  if you’re continuing to make or share crystals and related writing.
  • If you have a blog, you can make and create in your own digital space and share to the community on Twitter with the #imakesci hashtag or the G+ community Remix, Remake, Curate.

For More Info

Coming up

The final Google Hangout will be held on Friday, March 6 at 10:30am EST.  We will be discussing ways to remix, remake and curate the MOOC.  The final Twitter chat will be held next Friday, March 13 at 10:30am EST.  This will be the last synchronous event of the MOOC but there is always time to continue making, sharing and reflecting on the G+ Community and on Twitter.

Sincerely,

Make Cycle 4 Facilitators

Becca Bulvanoski, Christy Flint, Trey Gass, Ashley Hutchinson, and Betsey White


Make Cycle 5: Curating Your MOOC

Wow! It seems like just yesterday that we posted the first Remix, Remake, Curate newsletter.  On February 1, we asked you to come along on a wild and wonderful journey to find the intersections of science and literacy, and you’ve been fantastic sci-fi travelers, helping us go where no MOOC had gone before.  Together, we’ve surveyed the terrain of citizen science, visualized the contours of sound, narrated our stories of nature, and tinkered with the building blocks of the micro-world.  We’ve been reminded that the best laid plans are always at the mercy of the nature, and we’ve had serendipitous moments that prompted us to make new memories and forge new learning pathways among each other and among the different make cycles.

Fieldpeaz Mention Map

Mentionmapp shows Twitter connections to people and hashtags

We’re not done yet!  The Making Growth Crystal Clear #imicro Make Cycle is still in full swing, and we hope you’ll continue to play with your pipe cleaners and Borax and join us this Tuesday, March 3 from 1-2pm EST for our Google Hangout on Air during which Christy Flint from the Museum of Natural Sciences will show the us some microscopic views of crystals in her lab while Trey Gass from the Poetry Project will help us see how our words can crystallize our thinking and learning.  Then, we’ll host our #imakesci #imicrosci Twitter chat on Wednesday, March 4 from 1-2pm EST to tweet out our six-word micro poems.

We’ve scheduled our final Google Hangout on Friday, March 6 at 10:30am EST, and we’re looking forward to discussing ways we’re remixing, remaking, and curating the MOOC, reflecting on our science literacy learning and imagining how we might continue to grow our learning ecosystems.  Our final Twitter chat will be held next Friday, March 13 at 10:30am EST, marking the last synchronous event of the MOOC, but we hope you’ll consider to linger, make, share, connect, and reflect on our G+ community and on Twitter.

What is Curation?

Curation is a term that the museum world knows well as they have been in the business of selecting, collecting, grouping, and storying objects for centuries.  As we see it, curation is an act of making as it prompts the curator to make meaning by finding the conversational threads between a set of objects,  between the objects and the self, and between the objects and the larger group or culture.  In the early part of the 21st century, however, we began talking more and more about content curation as a way to filter digital media overload, a person-centered act of making meaning by wading through the bits and bytes that composed our cyberspace.  As we curate physical and digital objects, we put them in a context that matters to us, adding value by creating personal and social webs of meaning around these objects.

Over the coming two weeks, we ask you to try your hand at curating your MOOC.  Our friend Steve Fulton, a teacher consultant with the UNC-C Writing Project, has written a great blog post about teaching young people to curate, and we think you’ll find his instructions and examples helpful.  As you curate, here are some questions to keep in mind:

  • What objects (digital or physical) mattered to you?
  • Why? What story do they tell?
  •  How did your making and makes intersect with others’ making and makes?
  • Where do you find powerful intersections of science and literacy?
  • How will you draw on your MOOC experiences in the future?  What will you carry forward?
  • What will science learning look like for you in the next month or the next year?

Make With Me

As always, the ways you make and the tools you use are up to you. Here are a few ideas that have inspired us to curate our science learning experiences.

Draw a Conceptual Map

Tree of Life Map by Catherine Way

Tree of Life Map by Catherine Way

Show us where you’ve been or show us where you’ll go.  Consider using a natural shape like the DNA helix and show us what connections you’ve made through the base pairs. Or perhaps, the Tree of Life Idea map pictured here could help you chart important science literacy moments in your life, during the MOOC, and into the future.  Document your experiences and add imaginary rings to show us how you’ll continue to grow your science learning.

Create a Memory Palace

A classical device to “place” memories, the memory palace has traditionally been thought of as an indoor space where one could store memories and retrieve them by visualizing the place.  The method of remembering based on spatial location, however, can easily adapted to outdoor spaces. You might visualize your favorite place in nature and work to place important science learning moments from the MOOC in that scene.  Or you might decide to recreate your first citizen science walk, finding “pegs” along the way to anchor your science learning moments.  Here’s an example of how author Helmut Sachs applies this “journey method” of remembering in A Walk in Tropical Battambang.

Write a Poem
Our first archivists were poets, using the spoken word as a vehicle for collective memory.  Sift through the MOOC archives and comb through your memories, find tweets, lines of dialogue in the Google Hangouts, other people’s poems, posts, and pictures that are meaningful to you. Assemble these snippets to create a found poem that captures your experience of Remix, Remake, Curate.  Record and share!

Make a Digital Curation

Curating Make Cycle 1 with Pearltrees

If you’ve been active on Twitter, make a mentionmapp that shows how you’ve connected to others and to particular hashtags.  Create your personal story of Remix, Remake, Curate using Storify.  Make a Pinterest Board that collects and contextualizes artifacts from the MOOC or use Pearltrees, a web curation tool that allows users to drag and drop images, web pages, photos, and files as well as add notes to their curations.

Places to Share

Just a reminder, here are the handy links to places we’ve been using to share and connect.

For More Info

Finally

We’ll send out the Making Growth Crystal Clear#imicro wrap-up newsletter later in the week and another mid-cycle Curating Your MOOC #iremixsci newsletter next Sunday.  Since our weeks have been extended due to weather and we’ve overlapped a bit, we want you to have plenty of time to untangle the MOOC, reflect on your experiences, and make plans for your science learning future.   As Gloria Anzuldua wrote, “One always writes and reads from where one’s feet are planted, the ground one stands on, one’s particular position, point of view.” We look forward to the ways you’ll choose to remix, remake, and curate this MOOC, telling our science stories from your own remarkable perspective.

Sincerely,

The entire facilitation team at Remix, Remake, Curate


Make Cycle 3 Wrap-Up: Collecting Nature, Science, and Memory

Nature, Adaptation, and Evolution

It seems fitting that the third make cycle of Remix, Remake and Curate, focused on collecting memories of the natural world, coincided with a major weather event, giving us even more opportunities to make nature memories. It’s not over yet – one of the advantages of a MOOC is that we can continue to share, post, and collect even after the make cycle wraps. We can adapt the MOOC to fit our own needs. The MOOC evolves.

AkiYa

Though we’re posting the wrap-up now, we know that more poems and memories are coming – we can’t wait to see and respond to them, but we’re also excited to see how our next make cycle, #imicro, crystallizes.

We want to thank everyone for sharing their own memories of the natural world. It was really interesting to see all of the different tools and genres these memories were shared in – video, audio, meme, slideshow, comic, journal, narrative, and more. As we continue into the next make cycle, Making Growth Crystal Clear, we hope that you will continue to share memories and write more poetry as we think about the importance of collecting specimens from both the natural world and our own memories.

We know more awesomeness is coming, but let’s take a moment to highlight some of the awesome things we’ve seen already this make cycle:

 

ShelbyThe MOOC evolves!

New facilitators have already started sharing new activities, tools, and challenges.  We encourage you to keep making and posting your poems and memories to #inatsci. We hope you also think of new ways to integrate technology with the natural world as you create and share on Twitter and G+. We would love for you to share your own ideas and resources to inspire others to do the same. Just use the #inatsci category in Google+ and the #imakesci & #inatsci hashtags on Twitter.  Feel free to keep exploring and collecting memories, or push ahead into the next make cycle.  This is your MOOC experience–it’s up to you!

 

As a reminder, here are some places to share and connect:

  • Join our Google+ Community, Remix, Remake, Curate. Post your thoughts, questions, ideas, and especially your young people’s work here. Record student poetry, share their observations, let them see what other kids are doing, and share feedback to their work.
  • On Twitter, we encourage you to follow and use the #imakesci hashtag. Keep using #inatsci if you’re continuing to make or share resources related to nature memories.
  • If you have a blog, you can make and create in your own digital space and share to the community on Twitter with the #imakesci hashtag or the G+ community Remix, Remake, Curate.

For More Info

Coming up

Check out the Make Cycle 4: Making Growth Crystal Clear (#imicro) newsletter.  We’re excited to roll out this new make cycle that focuses on seeing growth on a micro level.  As always, we’re happy to help you think through technology sticky points, fuzzy ideas, potential collaborations, and classroom implementations. Just let us know how we can help!

Sincerely,

Make Cycle 2 Facilitators – Daniel Niece, Debra Pagona, Jennifer Smyth , Josephus Thompson III , and Steven Turner


Make Cycle 4: Making Growth Crystal Clear

Hi everyone, and welcome to Week Four of Remix, Remake, Curate!  We are ready to kick off this week by exploring the micro world of crystals. We enjoyed reading, listening to, and watching your nature memories last week, and we will be overlapping a bit by continuing Make Cycle 3 due to last week’s ice and snow. While we’ve had a great time spending time outdoors with the last make cycle, we’re bringing the science of making indoors this week. As we progress, we will dive into #imicrosci with the science of crystal formation by exploring how to make various types of crystals and sharing how our discoveries tie in to growth through story writing and poetry. As with each Make Cycle in this MOOC, you are welcome to join in where you can, tacking and jibing, making and creating various types of crystals, giving and taking according to your interests, passions, and availabilities.

This week’s make cycle might appeal to the artist, writer, scientist, or even mathematician in you. We’ll be growing our own crystals in a few different ways using only a handful of simple materials. In many areas of the county, you have only had to look out your window this last week to see ice crystals, but this week, we hope you will explore growing a couple of other different types of crystals with us.

Shapes-of-Snowflakes

Make With Me

During this make cycle, we suggest the following activities to guide a study of crystals and growth.

Create a shape or word that represents what growth means to you.

Later, we’ll be growing crystals on pipe cleaners, so first, we need to start with the pipe cleaner itself.  Think about what growth means to you, either personal growth or a type of growth you’re studying in a class. Choose a word or image that represents the type of growth you want to explore. Then, shape your pipe cleaner into that word or image. Don’t be afraid to get creative with language and with visuals. If you want to get crazy and use more than one pipe cleaner, go wild.

pipe cleaner_Borax_0 hours

Pipe cleaner in borax solution

Grow crystals with borax

Following these simple directions, you can grow your own crystals with a handful of ingredients. You should start to see crystal growth within a matter of hours. We would love for you to document your crystal growth and post pictures in our Google + Community. If you’ve only got time to take one picture, post it. If you’re able to set up a time lapse camera and make a video of the crystal growth from start to finish, post it. We can’t wait to see what words and images you come up with, and how your creations transform as your crystals start to grow. Christy Flint, who works in the Micro World Lab at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, has been playing with crystal growth in her lab for the past few weeks, examining borax crystals like the ones we’re making this week, as well as salt crystals.

IMG_2780

Microscopic view of salt crystal in Christy Flint’s lab

Compose a six word poem about growth

We can start with a longer story or description of growth, and then we’ll work on whittling down to a six word poem. Trey Gass of The Poetry Project will be helping guide us in this activity during our Google Hangout on Tuesday, February 24th at 1pm. He will be working with us on putting our thoughts about growth into words. He’ll take us through a process of solidifying those thoughts and distilling them down to the most important pieces to produce a six word poem. Trey will help us see how our thoughts and words can crystallize, just like the materials we’re working with this week. If you miss the Hangout, no worries, it will be recorded so you can access it at any time, and you can get some of Trey’s other materials here. On Thursday, February 26th, TRWP facilitator Ashley Hutchinson will host a Twitter chat and invite you to tweet out your six word poems. We’ll also suggest ways for you to…

Remix

Consider using a tech tool to remix your six word poem. What would help you communicate your thoughts? Images? Video? Sound? You could record your poem using the SoundSee app from the 2nd make cycle, record your poem over a time lapse video of your crystal growth, make a Thing Link using pictures of your crystal, or engage in many other possibilities!

Materials and Inspiration

  • Borax
  • Pipe cleaners
  • Water
  • Container
  • Paperclips
  • Chopsticks or Pencils
  • Computer with Internet connectivity
  • Camera
  • Writing materials- paper, pen, etc

Last year was the International Year of Crystallography. Check out one of the winning student videos right here in the blog, or click here for more.

Places to Share

Just a reminder, here are the handy links to places we’ve been using to share and connect.

  • In Google Plus (G+), we hope you have all joined our Remix, Remake, Curate G+ community.
  • On Twitter, we encourage you to follow and use the #imakesci and #imicro
  • If you have a blog, you can make and create in your own digital space and share to the community on twitter with the #imakesci #imicro hashtag or the G+ community.

Live Events

We will be hosting a Google Hangout to show off some of our crystals, look at them under a microscope, and do a little writing on Tuesday, March 3rd from 1-2pm EST.

On Wednesday, March 4th, join us on Twitter for a chat about growth, six-word poems, and opportunities for remix. To join, follow use #imicro.

For more information on Google Hangouts, check out Getting Started with Google Hangouts in the Guide to Social Tools section of the TRWPConnect blog.

For More Info

Finally

We hope you have a great time playing around with science and words, growing crystals and writing reflections. Remember to share what you see and learn about growth in our G+ Community. We can’t wait to hear what you have to say about what growth is how you experience growth as a maker of science during this make cycle.

 Sincerely,

Make Cycle 4 Facilitators

Becca Bulvanoski, Christy Flint, Trey Gass, Ashley Hutchinson, and Betsey White


Make Cycle 3: Collecting Nature, Science, and Memory

Welcome to #inatsci, Week 3 of Remix, Remake, Curate. For the first two weeks of the MOOC, we’ve been exploring the natural world and our place in it, by bioblitzing our way into citizen science, visualizing the human soundscape of our own voices, and writing poetry about our experiences. This week we’re going to be exploring how art and natural science connect by collecting our own memories about nature and using them as inspiration for our own poems.

Make Cycle 3:  Collecting Nature, Science, and Memory

Scientific progress and the success of future research depends on scientific collections, in which specimen samples are stored for the purpose of research and knowledge. These collections include artifacts, natural history samples (rocks, plants, animals), living collections, and recently have begun to include DNA extraction.  In each of our minds we have a similar collection of stored images, sounds, smells, tastes, and even feelings of nature.  Some of these come from nature walks, our own homes and yards, television, the internet, or even our dreams.  Explore the resources listed here as you ask yourself this essential question: What is my nature story?

As you begin to find the answer to that question, explore the options below as a way to help tell your story.  We also hope you  take it to the next level by remixing it with poetry (see the video shared below) as well as anything else you create and share it on our Google +  Community page.  We hope you’ll also consider joining our Google Hangout with the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences to interact with other participants and learn about the museum’s collection on Tuesday, February 17 from 10:00-10:40 or from 2:10-2:50 and help us write a crowdsourced poem during our Twitter chat session beginning on Wednesday morning at 8:45-9:00 (and continuing throughout the day at #inatsci ).

We can’t wait to hear your story!  Use the tools and information below to get you started.

Make With Me: Collecting Stories

We suggest the following activities to guide your exploration of collecting.

  • Listen to Ann Smith and Karen Linehan’s shared nature memories, documented through StoryCorps.
  • Collect your own nature memories. To collect your memories, try one or more of these options, or create your own:

Explore Museum Resources

  • Check out this video of the Naturalist Lab at the NC Natural Science Museum, a hands-on lab space dedicated to exploring some of the thousands of specimens in the museum’s collection.
  • Use the Natural Science Museum’s Online Collections Database to explore the museum’s collection and find out more about the taxonomy and expand your knowledge about the facts behind your nature story. It’s searchable by taxonomy and location, and you can even map your search results.
  • Explore this PowerPoint created to help you understand the role of museum collections.

Explore Additional Resources

Making Poetry

Check out the video below, in which The Poetry Project’s Josephus Thompson III walks us through the process of turning our nature memories into poems.

You can also join us for our Twitter chat, Wednesday starting at 8:45, as we write a poem together using the hashtag #inatsci . We’ll post a Storify of the poem to the Remix, Remake, Curate Google+ Community that evening.

Materials and Inspiration

  • Computer with internet connectivity
  • Camera
  • Drawing materials
  • Writing materials – paper, pen, etc.

Places to Share

Just a reminder, here are the handy links to places we’ve been using to share and connect.

  • Join our Google+ Community, Remix, Remake, Curate. Post your thoughts, questions, ideas, and especially your students’ work here. Record student poetry, share their observations, and let them see what other kids are doing.
  • Join our Google Hangout on Tuesday, February 17 from 10:00 to 10:40 or from 2:10 to 2:50.  We’ll talk with Steven Turner of the Naturalist Lab at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Science, who will share some of the specimens in the museum’s collection.
  • On Twitter, we encourage you to follow and use the #inatsci and #imakesci hashtags. Share resources throughout the week, and write a poem with us on Wednesday, February 18 starting at 8:45am.
  • If you have a blog, you can make and create in your own digital space and share to the community on Twitter with the #imakesci hashtag or the G+ community Remix, Remake, Curate.

For More Info

Finally

When you decide to conclude your investigation with us, we hope that you have a clearer picture of how museums help us to collect the stories of the natural world.  We also hope you begin to see yourself as a scientist helping collect those stories in your everyday life.  After all, we can all contribute to science just by observing and documenting the natural world we all share.

Sincerely,

Make Cycle 2 Facilitators – Daniel Niece, Debra Pagona, Jennifer Smyth , Josephus Thompson III , and Steven Turner

 


Make Cycle 2 Wrap-Up:The Human Soundscape

Sound Off!

Screen Shot 2015-02-14 at 4.20.28 PMAs we wrap up the second make cycle of Remix, Remake and Curate, we want to thank everyone for sharing their unique “I am From” poems, thinking about all things sound and using the SoundSee App to visualize and remix their voices. As we continue into the next make cycle, Storying Our Natural Science, we hope that you will continue to tinker with SoundSee and write more poetry as we think about how our bodies make, interpret and visualize sound.

So far during this make cycle we have seen some awesome creations and ideas. Let’s take a moment to highlight some of this week’s awesome posts:

  • Walt Gurley got us started of with some great demonstrations of SoundSee and helped us all to see what the possibilities are in this new App.
  • Micah Graves gave a great demonstration of expression through spoken word.
  • We saw several students posting “I am From” poems that extended the soundscape by blending their voice with music/beats.
  • Dakota Williams posted a great “I am from” poem that incorporated a background music track.
  • Rodneisha Morings breaks down her process of remixing her “I am from” poem remake using SoundSee and Incredibox Beatmaker to create multilayered piece.
  • Rob Puckett and his students had a great time participating in the Google hangout. Students talked about how sound affects them, their moods and emotions. They made a beat circle recording of their nature words and sounds from the previous make cycle’s nature poem activity. They also read their Nature Poems into the SoundSee app to see what their voice patterns looked like. Playing with the app to manipulate their voices was a highlight of the experience.
  • Third-graders in Coni Clark’s classroom analyzed sounds in nature and created haikus based on those sounds.  Then, they added sound effects using their voices and bodies to bring their poems to life.

The MOOC moves on!

New facilitators will take over tomorrow with new activities, tools, and challenges.  We encourage you to keep making and posting your spoken word poetry and audio files created in SoundSee to #ivizsci. Continue to use SoundSee and think of new ways to create and share on Twitter and G+. We would love for you to share your own ideas and resources to inspire others to do the same. Just use the #vizsci category in Google+ and the #imakesci & #ivizsci hashtags on Twitter.  Feel free to linger for the next five weeks exploring the Human Scoundscape and the wonders of sound or push ahead into the next make cycle.  This is your MOOC experience–it’s up to you!

As we wind up, we hope you will reflect on the make cycle using the following questions to think through the make cycle and all that you have accomplished:

    • What was interesting or surprised you? Why?
    • What aspects were difficult? Why?
    • What aspects were (un)comfortable? Why?
    • What’d you learn about self? Others? Sound(s)?
    • How did visualizing your voice alter your perception of just hearing your voice?
    • What else do you want to learn or connect to in relation to this cycle?
    • How do the ideas in this make cycle connect to other subject areas or ideas?

As a reminder, here are some places to share and connect:

  • Join our Google+ Community, Remix, Remake, Curate. Post your thoughts, questions, ideas, and especially your young people’s work here. Record student poetry, share their observations, let them see what other kids are doing, and share feedback to their work.
  • On Twitter, we encourage you to follow and use the #imakesci hashtag. Keep using #ivizsci if you’re continuing to make or share resources related to visualizing sound.
  • If you have a blog, you can make and create in your own digital space and share to the community on Twitter with the #imakesci hashtag or the G+ community Remix, Remake, Curate.

For More Info

Coming up

Look out for the Make Cycle 3: Storying Natural Science (#inatsci) newsletter tomorrow–Sunday, February 15.  We’re excited to roll out this new make cycle next week that focuses on how and why we tell stories about the natural world.  As always, we’re happy to help you think through technology sticky points, fuzzy ideas, potential collaborations, and classroom implementations. Just let us know how we can help!

Sincerely,

Danielle Lewis, Walt Gurley, Rob Puckett, Coni Clark and Micah Graves


Make Cycle 2: The Human Soundscape

Welcome to Remix, Remake, Curate Make Cycle 2!  This week, we’ll learn about the human soundscape and how our bodies create, interpret, visualize and enjoy sound.

Screen Shot 2015-02-08 at 11.42.45 AMDuring this make cycle, we will think about all things sound. We will create a poem which will be used as a means to explore the ability of the human body to create, receive, interpret and enjoy sound. We are excited to premiere a new, open-source App, SoundSee, created by NC Museum of Natural Sciences Visual World Investigate Lab Co-ordinator Walt Gurley, that allows participants the ability to record, visualize, and remix their voice recordings. To conclude, we will reflect on this make cycle as a means of growth and consider the significance of modeling this process of making with our colleagues and young people. In turn, we guide young people to discover the value of creation, inquiry, collaboration and reflection. We hope that you will join us on Monday, February 9 from 10:00-11:00 am for our Google hangout and Friday, February 13, from 4:30-5:30 pm for our Twitter chat.

As you create and compose this week, we invite you to think about these questions:

  • What is sound and how can we visualize sound?
  • How do we make and interpret sound?
  • What sounds do I find to be interesting and intriguing and why?
  • How is sound a part of our identity?
  • How does sound, music and poetry inspire change?
  • How can learning and thinking about sound lead to further discovery?

Make With Me

During this make cycle you could:

  • Create and/or compose a reflective/personal piece of writing that represents yourself. This poem will become the centerpiece for your make. You could compose a self-reflective “I am from…” poem or create a nature poem, using the  #icitsci quad box activity from the previous #ictisci make cycle. Micah’s nature poem, Baleen Whales inspired by an article about the 52 Hertz Whale, is an wonderful example of a spoken-word nature poem. While you are writing these amazing poems, think about the sounds you make and hear and how they impact the environment and those around you.
  • Inquire and research into how sound is created, received, interpreted, and enjoyed in and by our bodies. This would be an excellent opportunity to cross pollinate with your colleagues who are teaching health and body systems, or your team’s science teacher who might be teaching about the physics of soundwaves. Please see below for links to quick, digital resources for learning about the science of our body’s ability to hear, process, create and enjoy the sounds around us.

Science of How Music Enchants the Brain
Human Voice- how vocal cords work
BBC Video on how the ear works
Physics: Waves in General (Minute Physics)
Interactive ear
How Sound Travels 

  • Record, listen and reflect on your own and other’s voices. Check out the SoundSee App, created especially for this make cycle, to capture an audio recording of your recently composed poem. You can use the App to listen to your own voice and the recordings of your peers reciting their poems. What predictions do you have for what your voice will “look” like in the App?
  • Map, visualize, and analyze your own voice’s soundwaves and compare them to the class’s collective soundwave and voices within SoundSee. Another cool resource that you could explore is MmmTss. Are your students studying trigonometry or pre-calculus? How about incorporating an activity related to sine and cosine? Would you like to mix this up? Think about how the visualization and interpretation of sound varies from person to person- see the  Derek Paravicini- Piano Savant performance.  How could technology like the new App allow for a hearing impaired student to visualize sound?
  • Remix your voice recording into new and different products or genres. How much fun would it be for young people to bring in instruments, make instruments or to use electronics, such as MakeyMakey or Arduino to remix the audio of their poem? Do you have any talented beat boxers, such as Tom Thum (TedX), who could incorporate that skill? Why not discuss our body’s ability to make sounds such as Tom’s? Why not try CJ’s Rhythm Circle activity, from the citizen science make cycle, and have students create a multi-layered poetry performance with excerpts from their own poems layered into a performance based, “We are From” poem? What other natural mechanisms do different species have to make unique sounds and communicate?

Materials and Inspiration

  • Computer with internet connectivity (SoundSee works best in Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox and requires a microphone)
  • Writing materials – paper, pen, etc.
  • Optional materials could include musical instruments and other sound making devices

Places to Share

Just a reminder, here are the handy links to places we’ve been using to share and connect.

  • Join our Google+ Community, Remix, Remake, Curate. Post your thoughts, questions, ideas, and especially your students’ work here. Record student poetry, share their observations, and let them see what other kids are doing.
  • Join our Google Hangout on Monday, February 9 from 10:00-10:50 AM. We’ll talk about everyone’s plans and ideas for the week, so you can participate in the conversation or simply watch with your group.
  • On Twitter, we encourage you to follow and use the #ivizsci and #imakesci hashtags. Share resources throughout the week, and chat with us during our Twitter chat on Friday, February 13 from 4:30-5:30.
  • If you have a blog, you can make and create in your own digital space and share to the community on Twitter with the #ivizsci hashtag or the G+ community Remix, Remake, Curate.

For More Info

Finally

Be sure to report out and reflect on Make Cycle #2 in the G+ community. We are all excited to see the awesome makes and to hear about your’s and your student’s “Ah-ha” moments about the science of the human soundscape.

Sincerely,

Make Cycle 2 Facilitators, Danielle Lewis, Rob Puckett,  Walt Gurley, Micah Graves, and Coni Clark


Make Cycle 1 Wrap-Up: Citizen Science

Wow!  We did it!

Sir Walter Raleigh ScientistAs we finish up the first Make Cycle of Remix, Remake, Curate (#imakesci), we want to express our appreciation and admiration for the ways in which you all jumped right in, becoming citizen scientists and thoughtful poets, making and sharing science and science media from your back yards and school yards.  Our Google+ Community has 114 members, and we’re just getting started!  Feel free to share this newsletter with others and invite your friends, neighbors, or colleagues to join in the fun.

This week, we asked MOOC participants to conduct a “bioblitz,” what NC Museum of Natural Sciences aquatic entomologist Chris GoForth calls an intensive biodiversity survey of an area.  When people make repeated observations of an area, she notes, they begin to see the ways that an individual species fits into the whole.  They start to see the connections between living things and understand that biodiversity matters.  The next step, Chris says, can be to move from noticing and documenting to advocating and stewarding, making spaces like native gardens that support and nurture varied forms of life.  Here’s a great resource from the US Department of Agriculture on native gardening to get you started.

#icitsci Fabulous Finds

So far in the first Make Cycle we have had some pretty awesome projects posted to the community. Let’s take a few minutes to showcase a few of the makes that really stood out.

  • Debra Pagona and Rebecca Bulvanowski‘s elementary students at WH Robinson in Pitt County, NC showed us that size doesn’t matter when it comes to making a big beat!  These little people took a science science walk, found a birch tree, wrote a classroom poem, and made a fantastic nature beat circle.moss
  • And who says you can’t find wild life in urban places?  ASTC program specialist Korrie Twiggs snapped pictures of this fierce hawk in the heart of Washington, DC.  She logged her find in the iNaturalist citizen science app and found that others had seen him in the area as well.  He seems to have a big appetite for squirrels and other birds!
  • After a nature walk with her classmates, Shakir Gay wrote a poem titled Dangerous Cattail prompted by the similarities she saw between the cattail and a hypodermic needle.  This poem illustrates the power of natural objects to open windows into our dream world.
  • Austin Coats focused our attention on often ignored flora like tree moss in his poem titled Am I Useless?
  • And finally, Kaytee Smith at the NC Museum of Natural Sciences reminded us that the Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC) starts next week, February 13-16.  The oldest citizen science project on the web, the GBBC invites anyone anywhere to notice, count, and document the abundance and distribution of birds worldwide.

Places to Share

Even though the MOOC will move forward with new facilitators and activities starting tomorrow, we invite you to linger with #icitsci if that suits your fancy. Continue to use iNaturalist, join an #icitsci project– the GBBC, perhaps, repeat the bioblitzes in your backyards and schools, and don’t stop making and sharing your #icitsci science and science poetry.  Just use the #icitsci category in Google+ and the #imakesci & #icitsci hashtags on Twitter.  Feel free to move on or spend the next five weeks exploring citizen science.  This is your MOOC experience–it’s up to you!

iNaturalistAs a reminder, here are some places to share and connect:

  • Join our Google+ Community, Remix, Remake, Curate. Post your thoughts, questions, ideas, and especially your young people’s work here. Record student poetry, share their observations, and let them see what other kids are doing.
  • On Twitter, we encourage you to follow and use the #imakesci hashtag. Keep using #icitsci if you’re continuing to make or share resources related to citizen science.
  • If you have a blog, you can make and create in your own digital space and share to the community on Twitter with the #imakesci hashtag or the G+ community Remix, Remake, Curate.

For More Info

Coming Up…

Look out for the Make Cycle 2: #ivizsci Newsletter tomorrow–Sunday, February 8.  We’re excited to roll out a new make cycle next week with new make ideas and a focus on visualizing science.  As always, we’re happy to help you think through technology sticky points, fuzzy ideas, potential collaborations, and classroom implementations.  Just let us know how we can help!

Sincerely,

Chris Goforth, Stephanie West-Puckett, Michael Flinchbaugh, and CJ Suitt, Make Cycle 1 #icitsci Facilitators


Make Cycle 1: Citizen Science

Hi, everyone and welcome to Remix, Remake, Curate!  Over the next five weeks, join us as we explore the intersections of science and poetry in the world around us.  Each week, we’ll focus on a different topic and provide you with a set of activities that you can follow along with in your classroom, youth group, after school program, or on your own.  Over the week, you’ll explore a scientific concept and produce one or more products that represent what you learned that you can share with everyone else.  We’ll also host two scheduled events each week that you can be a part of, a Twitter chat session and a Google Hangout.  These scheduled events will get you started, help you participate in the projects, and communicate your results with the community.  Overall, we hope that you learn something new about science or the natural world, do something creative with your learning, and have a ton of fun as you do it!

kids on ladybug huntMake Cycle 1: Citizen Science

We’re starting things off with citizen science!  Citizen science is a partnership between the public and professional researchers to answer scientific questions or solve scientific problems.  In essence, citizen science is a way for anyone, regardless of your personal experience in science or your past experiences, to participate in scientific research!  There are thousands of citizen science projects available in the world, but we want you to focus on biodiversity (the variety of life on Earth) this week.  Simply create an account on iNaturalist.org, head outside, take pictures of the species that you encounter, and upload your images to iNaturalist.  By doing so, you will share the observations you make of your local biodiversity with scientists worldwide, other citizen scientists, and other participants in this project.  Once you make some observations of the species in your area outside, you’ll write some poetry based on what you saw and create a rhythm circle with your group to bring everyone together as a group!  You can share your observations, poetry, rhythm circle sessions, and anything else you create this week with everyone else through our Google+ community page.  We hope you’ll also consider joining our Twitter chat session on Tuesday, February 3 from 7:30-8:30pm and our Google Hangout on Friday, February 6 from 10:30-11:30am to interact with other participants.

Let’s learn more about the species that live around us together!  The tools and information below will help you get started.

Make With Me

We suggest the following activities to guide your exploration of the biodiversity of life in your area.

Field Walk and Documentation

  • Go outside – anywhere that you’d like to explore!  See how many living creatures you can find and take pictures of each species you see.
  • Back inside, submit some or all of your observations to iNaturalist – visit our project iNaturalist page or join the Remix, Remake, Curate project through the iNaturalist mobile app.  Suggested instructions for how to do your nature observations are available online if you want some help.

Poetry

  • Participants will create a quad box poem about a species that they found particularly interesting in their explorations. We have included a template for a great poetry format you can use to guide your students through the activity.  Share some or all of your poems on the Google+ community!  The following video explains how to think through turning your quad box into a poem:
  • Create a rhythm circle based on the things your entire group discovered and wrote.  If you have permission, consider filming your group’s rhythm circle and uploading it to Google+!

Materials and Inspiration

Places to Share

Just a reminder, here are the handy links to places we’ve been using to share and connect.

  • Join our Google+ Community, Remix, Remake, Curate. Post your thoughts, questions, ideas, and especially your students’ work here. Record student poetry, share their observations, and let them see what other kids are doing.
  • On Twitter, we encourage you to follow and use the #icitsci and #imakesci hashtags. Share resources throughout the week, and chat with us on Tuesday, February 3 from 7:30-8:30pm.
  • Join our Google Hangout on Friday, February 6 from 10:30-11:30am.  We’ll talk about everyone’s experiences over the week, so you can participate in the conversation or simply watch with your group.
  • If you have a blog, you can make and create in your own digital space and share to the community on Twitter with the #imakesci hashtag or the G+ community Remix, Remake, Curate.

For More Info

Finally

When the week is over — or whenever you and your young people decide you are finished with the citizen science make — we hope they are able to see themselves as scientists, as citizens contributing to a scientific understanding of the environment. Along the way, they will discover that life is everywhere hiding in the nooks of tree bark and digging its way through concrete surfaces. Taking time to observe and record the diversity of life in that environment is an important step to maintaining its integrity.